Tweets of the Week 5.28.15

There is great value in saying something in a memorable, concise manner. Twitter has caused us to make this a near spiritual discipline. For my own growth (as a generally verbose individual… that’s a long way of saying “wordy”) and for the benefit of others, I highlight tweets each week that deliver a big message in a few words.

#ManTrip6: Reflections on a Rocky Mountain Adventure

One of the things I have found most satisfying as a parent is setting aside time each year for a memorable trip with my two sons. In previous posts I have discussed

(1) the kindergarten right of passage trip I took with my first son,
(2) a trip we took when he was especially discouraged at school,
(3) the kindergarten right of passage with my youngest son,
(4) the first before-school-starts joint trip we took as this tradition took on life, and
(5) the before-school-start joint trip we took to Texas (involving their first flight).

LM_rockytopIn this post I will reflect on the latest trip we took to the mountains of West Carolina. With each trip like this we take, my boys become more familiar with the idea; which is both an asset and liability to what we want to accomplish.

The bullets below are arranged chronologically through our trip with thoughts about what went well, what didn’t, and why we did things the way we did.

  • I picked the boys up early from school and we went to try sushi. One of our goals on every “man trip” is to try new things so that fear becomes less of a reason my boys would back out of something God would call them to do. Sushi was about as scary of a food as my oldest could think of to try, so we went for it. He boldly took a bite and was content with his accomplishment.
  • Then we drove to a cabin in the mountains of Northwest NC. Once we got there, we went to town to get supplies and get dinner (this time just a Mexican restaurant). When we got back we explored the woods for good fishing holes later in the trip.
  • The next morning we got up and drove to Boone, NC for a day of rock climbing. We scheduled an all-day package with Rock Dimensions. It was a phenomenal experience. We spent the morning practicing on their tower in town and the afternoon climbing and repelling rock faces in the mountain. Another great time of helping my boys face something scary and seeing the fruit of facing those fears. Pictures available on my Instagram account.
  • Quote of the trip – “Papa, that was scary, but a fun kind of scary,” my youngest son on repelling.
  • When we got back to the cabin we explored the woods for more fishing holes. Hiking in the woods after dark is a great adventure and cultivates lots of conversations.
  • The next day we slept in, which means 8am by little boy standards, and went fishing. This is when we engaged one of our other objectives; having important conversations. With my oldest going into 5th grade, we began the conversation about sex.
  • Since my sons are very close friends, it didn’t seem wise to talk with one and not the other. It is likely too much would get “lost in translation.”
  • I began with an open-ended question, “Have your friends at school talked about sex?” I was curious to know what he knew, or thought he knew.
  • We engaged the subject socially. “Your friends are likely to start talking about sex and I didn’t want you to feel like there were important things you didn’t know.”
  • We talked about key terminology. We talked about the right names for male anatomy, female anatomy, what a virgin is, and the experience of a wet dream. Most of these were framed in terms of embarrassing questions a friend might try to catch them in (i.e., “Are you a virgin?”) and make fun of their answer either way. I helped them understand how to navigate those social situations and let them know they could ask us about any words they didn’t know what they meant.
  • We talked about biology. We talked about sperm, eggs, and DNA. DNA may have been the only part of the conversation that wasn’t awkward for them. They liked learning how they got traits from both Sallie and I, and mentioned this part of the conversation several times on the rest of the trip.
  • We talked about theology. We talked about how God made sex as a gift for husbands and wives in marriage and as a way to produce babies.
  • We didn’t talk about the activity of sex in much detail. This wasn’t needed or age appropriate. Creating the mental image of the physical act would, in my opinion, be pre-mature. The previous points are sufficient for them to understand the physiological changes they’ll begin to experience and navigate the social contexts they’ll find themselves in. My goal was to equip them for the next season of their life; not to educate them to pass a test on sex ed.
  • We left the conversation open-ended. The main take-aways I wanted my boys to have were: (a) we can talk with Mama or Papa if we have questions about sex, (b) they are expecting the topic of sex to come up socially, and (c) we have enough vocabulary to put our questions into words.
  • LM_stream fishingAfter fishing we went back to the cabin, had lunch, and then decided to wade the stream (since the fish weren’t biting; we only caught two). For the next three hours we walked several miles up and down the mountain stream. It was extremely cold and fun. We chased many more fish than we caught. By the end we were falling-over-tired and the current of the stream didn’t help.
  • We got dinner at the same restaurant since the boys liked it and did some more fishing that evening before finding some new rocks to climb. This time was intentionally very free to “play” together in whatever ways caught their interest. A highlight was my oldest slipping and falling face-first in a creek. They both laughed about it all night long. We slept very well that night.
  • The next morning we packed up the cabin, carved some decayed mountain wood with the pocket knives I have them as a gift, and headed home. It is our tradition to stop at Applebee’s (my youngest’s favorite restaurant) on the way home and review the whole trip. This is a chance to help them review the experience and help cement the memories.
  • One of the side benefits of these trips is that it gives me wife a few days fully “off duty.” She gets a quiet house, with no one to clean up after or cook for, and the opportunity to do whatever she wants. So the “man trip” is not just fun for the boys.

This is a tradition that I would commend to any parent, but especially fathers. The value of getting 72 uninterrupted hours with my boys is something that is hard to put into words. Both the quality of bond and type of understanding I gain from this time is different from having dinner together, coaching their sports teams, or playing in the back yard. These moments create memories I will always cherish and, I hope, cement life lessons my boys will never forget.

Gluttony: Gospel Reflections for Foodies & Comfort Eaters

eat4Are we really going to talk about gluttony? Do we have to? No one wants to see the end of church pot lucks or tailgating rituals, right? I mean, what’s the point? Isn’t gluttony one of those bad habits (not really a sin) that’s its own punishment? Isn’t talking about it in church just a form of emotional-moral double jeopardy?

Yes, we need to talk about and, if your instinct is to think this discussion can only be a “guilt trip,” then we need to talk about it all the more. When we only talk about “bad sins,” meaning the kind that no one in our “in group” admits to committing, then we relegate the power of the gospel to salvation and crises; meaning, after we’ve “walked the aisle,” the gospel is just for others or when life’s falling apart.

Let’s stop and ask the question, “What might a struggle with gluttony reveal about us?” It could reveal any number of things.

  • An unhealthy, overscheduled lifestyle where we consider the care of our body, the temple of God (I Cor 6:19-20), an afterthought as we over eat (or eat poorly) in an effort to keep up with our out-of-whack priorities.
  • Sleep deprivation, based on an unhealthy, overscheduled life, as our body tries to supplement the energy from food – especially carbohydrates – to make up for the energy that is not being restored via sleep.
  • Comfort seeking behavior, as we seek to take refuge in the distraction and satisfaction of eating instead of casting our concerns on the one who cares for us (I Pet 5:7).
  • Pleasure-based living, as we atrophy our cognitive self-control muscles to choose wisdom over indulgence at least three times a day with a few snacks thrown in for good measure.
  • Pride, even if we’re not trying to rank #1 in a competitive eating contest or win a “I conquered the mammoth burger t-shirt” at a local restaurant, it is easy to mistake the large quantities of food we can provide for ourselves as an accomplishment denoting our self-sufficiency.

Let’s ask the question another way, “Do you have a good relationship with food?” Allow this awkward excerpt from Mere Christianity to help you grasp the implications for this question.

“You can get a large audience together for a strip-tease – that is, to watch a girl undress on the stage. Now suppose you come to a country where you could fill a theatre by simply bringing a covered plate on the stage and then slowly lifting the cover so as to let everyone see, just before the lights went out, that is contained a mutton chop or a bit of bacon, would you not think that in that country something had gone wrong with the appetite for food? And would not anyone who had grown up in a different world think there was something equally queer about the state of the sex instinct among us (p. 96)?” C.S. Lewis

When we stop to consider it, we can quickly see that in a culture simultaneously marked by obesity and obsessed with thinness, we have an unhealthy relationship with food. Whether we over-indulge or punitively-avoid, few of us simply-enjoy food as God intended.

Before we get to the gospel-corrective, let’s establish a few key points about food.

  1. God made food and wants us to enjoy it (Acts 10:9-16).
  2. Heaven will contain a bountiful feast, but no one will feel compelled to gluttony (Rev 19:6-9).
  3. God takes no delight in you feeling bad about your struggle with food (John 10:10).
  4. God takes great joy in seeing his children grow into maturity in every area of their life (III John 4).
  5. An unhealthy relationship with food detracts from our enjoyment of life (I Cor 6:12-13).
  6. God is most glorified in your eating when you enjoy his gift of food as he intended (I Cor 10:31).

In order to overcome gluttony you must be able to face the realities depicted in the first part of this post while maintaining the perspective represented by these six truths.

The “mechanics” of overcoming gluttony are relatively simple – eat only as much as is necessary to maintain a healthy body and fully enjoy every bite as a gift from God; allowing for periodic, guilt-free indulgences on special occasions (i.e., birthday, state fair, Thanksgiving, etc…). But let’s go back to five motives in the bullet points above and see what it looks like overcome gluttony through the gospel.

  • Busyness – Learn to be content as you steward the 168 hour week God provides. Rest in the knowledge that God’s will fits in God’s provision. Resist whatever drivers are compelling you to over-schedule. Invest in the parts of your life that really matter so you don’t feel like you’re always catching up and forcing to your eating habits to compensate.
  • Sleep Deprivation – Sleep is an act of faith. To spend 1/3 of your life in an unconscious state is an indication you trust God enough to go “off duty.” Wake up with a sense that the last 8 hours have honored God and allow that to shape your attitude towards the next 16 hours. Faith in God to sleep will impact honoring God as you eat.
  • Comfort – Pray. Don’t just “bless your meals” as if God wanted to be acknowledged as Provider more than he wanted to be trusted as Father. Whatever concerns tempt you to comfort eat, don’t cast them on a pint of ice cream, but on the One who promises to listen, be present, and walk with you (I Peter 5:7).
  • Pleasure – Enjoy food, but enjoy God more. If eating is one of your primary sensory pleasures, that’s great. God loves foodies! Allow your elevated pleasure in taste to become the baseline from which you begin to explore the joy available in God. This doesn’t mean trying to extend the Lord’s Supper from two courses to seven. But becoming mindful of what you enjoy about food (taste) and meals (social) and see how those pleasures can be ways to delight in God or make God known more than mere ends in themselves.
  • Pride – Acknowledging the sin of gluttony is humbling, but it is only shameful if we still want to be prideful or independent. Rightly understood, however, humility is a gift; not an insult. God’s main point in the gospel is to free us from dispositions like pride that would make his freedom seem like constricting. Accept the gift of God’s humble freedom as being better than food.

Hopefully with this post you can better see how freedom from gluttony is not anorexia and is worth pursuing. I hope you can engage this struggle to enjoy God’s gift of food in a balanced way, like we must battle for a balanced enjoyment of all God’s blessings. I hope you can appreciate how this is a fitting admonition to close this post, “Bon appetite to the glory and enjoyment of God!”

This blog was originally posted as part of the “Seven Deadly Sin” series at The Gospel Project.

Tweets of the Week 5.19.15

There is great value in saying something in a memorable, concise manner. Twitter has caused us to make this a near spiritual discipline. For my own growth (as a generally verbose individual… that’s a long way of saying “wordy”) and for the benefit of others, I highlight tweets each week that deliver a big message in a few words.

And one because it’s funny…

Memories After Forgiveness: A Series from Miroslav Volf (Part 6 of 7)

miroslav_volfWhat do we do with memories of intense offenses after we forgive? This is a vexing question in a world marred by violence. Oh, that we could really “forgive and forget.” This is the question Miroslav Volf seeks to answer in his book The End of Memory: Remembering Rightly in aWorld of Violence.

This blog series the postscript to Dr. Volf’s book in which he seeks to illustrate what he’s taught through imagined conversations with “Captian G.” – his chief interrogator during Miroslav’s eight years of political imprisonment for being a Christian and “Western sympathizer” in the former communist Yugoslavia.

I admire the honesty and vulnerability of this book. It remains true to the historic Christian positions on forgiveness and righteousness without making the living of those answers seem any “neater” than they really are in a broken world. I hope this series of excerpts will motivate many people to read this excellent book. I believe its content can be of great benefit for those who’ve face various forms of abuse and what to know how to honor God with those memories they cannot forget.

This seven part series will be posted in the following units:

I told a friend about the encounters I’d imagined between Captain G. and me and about my labor of reconciliation. She was puzzled.

“Your brand of reconciliation seems cheap to me,” she said.

“Why cheap?” I asked, just to hear her say what I knew was on her mind.

“You’re letting him off the hook! He and the likes of him should have charges pressed against them. Your Captain G. should be punished: You harm others, you pay. It’s that simple. Otherwise you’ll have evildoers growing like weeds.”

“Punishment is too petty, and it doesn’t help that much. I want more. I want Captain G. dead!”

“What?! Where did that come from? You seem to me to want the ultimate punishment for him, not no punishment. I fail to see where reconciliation fits in to that picture! Which is it: death or unconditional forgiveness? Isn’t there some middle ground between the two extremes?”

“No, there isn’t – at least not good middle ground. Those extremes may sound incompatible, but they aren’t. This ‘death’ that I’m talking about is the word the Apostle Paul uses when he speaks of human transformation. He describes it as dying and rising with Christ. I want Captain G. to become a new person – dead to his old self and alive to his new self. I believe that Christ took all of our deserved punishment upon himself when he died on the cross. The only ‘punishment’ left for Captain G. to undergo is this ‘death’ to his old self.”

“And what if he doesn’t want to die?”

“Then we’ll want to make sure that he doesn’t pose a danger to others. What I am against is retribution. It’s incompatible with forgiveness and reconciliation. I am for transformation and, when necessary, containment and discipline, including incarceration. Do you think that’s cheap?”

“He hasn’t paid for what he’s done! Isn’t that cheap?”

“On the contrary – as expensive as it gets. In Christ, God was judged in his place!”

“God certainly comes in handy for you – does all the important work.”

“Would you have me believe that the Source of all that exists and the merciful Guide for all who walk the path of life just sits in a far corner of the heaven twiddling the almight thumbs? Either God exists and is then at the center of everything and affects it all, or God doesn’t exist. It is foolish to believe in a God does nothing. An idle God is a false god.”

“There are worse ways for God to be false.”

“I agree. But I wouldn’t count shouldering the sin of the world among the ways of being a false god – and certainly not a cheap form of reconciliation!”

Note on Continued Progress on the Site Rebuild

I continue to appreciate your patience as we rebuild the site. Progress is being made and I am starting to post some new blogs again, but most of my time is being devoted to reconstruction.

Hopefully in the next couple of weeks all of the old posts and resources will be restored. After that, I will be working on re-compiling the posts for the “Favorite Posts” series, which is intended to make the resources available on my site much more accessible.

Thank you for your patience. Things should be fully operational again soon.

Memories After Forgiveness: A Series from Miroslav Volf (Part 5 of 7)

miroslav_volfWhat do we do with memories of intense offenses after we forgive? This is a vexing question in a world marred by violence. Oh, that we could really “forgive and forget.” This is the question Miroslav Volf seeks to answer in his book The End of Memory: Remembering Rightly in aWorld of Violence.

This blog series the postscript to Dr. Volf’s book in which he seeks to illustrate what he’s taught through imagined conversations with “Captian G.” – his chief interrogator during Miroslav’s eight years of political imprisonment for being a Christian and “Western sympathizer” in the former communist Yugoslavia.

I admire the honesty and vulnerability of this book. It remains true to the historic Christian positions on forgiveness and righteousness without making the living of those answers seem any “neater” than they really are in a broken world. I hope this series of excerpts will motivate many people to read this excellent book. I believe its content can be of great benefit for those who’ve face various forms of abuse and what to know how to honor God with those memories they cannot forget.

This seven part series will be posted in the following units:

“You were right,” I said after we had exchanged the obligatory pleasantries. “I am a flawed human being. I shouldn’t have implied anything different. I wrong people all the time, mostly not out of malice but out of culpable laziness, which squelches my energy for doing good. I did not mean to paint you as a demon from an abyss and myself as an angel from on high.”

“I am sorry,” he said. “I should never have interrogated you years ago. I should not have inflicted psychological pain to extract information. Even if the system allowed it – indeed encouraged it – I had no right to do so. I regret that I wronged you.”

“I forgave you . . . and have also taken my forgiveness back as many times as I have given it to you – no testimony to my great virtue.”

“Earlier, when I mentioned that I had no place to stand outside the military system for which I worked, when I spoke of the need to feed my family, when I suggested that the evil had taken hold of me, I wasn’t trying to justify what I did. I merely wanted you to understand my actions in their context, to see my wrongdoing not simply as diabolical meanness but as the consequence of wrong seeing, as ‘culpable laziness,’ as you put it about yourself, as weakness, as misplaced belief in the rightness of my cause, and much more.”

“In that regard you and I are more similar than we are different.”

“You mentioned a sparkle of enjoyment in my eyes as I was pummeling you with threats. You were right. That’s what I am most ashamed of. I shudder now when I hear a war criminal say, ‘It’s nice to kill people,’ as I read that someone from our region said recently. Yet I cannot deny that I felt a rush of joy at humiliating others and causing them pain. I am doubly ashamed that you noticed that perverse joy. I myself don’t know what happened. The best explanation I can give is to repeat what I said earlier, namely, that evil got the better of me. Deep down I knew that what I was doing wasn’t right, even while I felt satisfaction in wrongdoing along with the benefits I was drawing from the system kept me going. Please forgive me.”

“I do forgive you; but more importantly, God forgives you. You should ask for God’s forgiveness, too; or rather, you should receive the forgiveness that God gave you.”

“I don’t care about God’s forgiveness; I do care about yours. Remember, I don’t believe in God.”

“But you see,” I interjected, “I believe that on my own I have no power and no right to forgive you. You haven’t broken some arbitrary rule I have made. By wronging me, you’ve transgressed the moral law God established to help us, God’s beloved creatures, to flourish; so you have wronged God. Ultimately, only God has the power and the right to forgive, and only God’s forgiveness can wash you clean of your wrongdoing. When I forgive you, I mostly just echo God’s forgiving of your sin.”

“You won’t be surprised to hear me say that I don’t think in those terms – I’m no theologian, as you know. But all’s well that ends well. So far as I’m concerned, the important thing is that you have forgiven me and taken away that burden of my past.”

“You may feel that I have taken away your burden, but actually, whether you believe it or not, God is the one who has shouldered the burden of your past. That is why I am both obligated and able to forgive you.”

“I repeat: To me, that you have done so is all that matters.”

“I understand. But you also should understand that what I have done is possibly only because of God. I don’t mean that God just made my forgiveness happen, like some magic trick. To be frank, I am sometimes angry at God for forgiving you. At those times I ask, What right does the Almighty have to forgive someone for an offense against me? And why should I have to remember the offense against me as an offense forgiven by God? What’s even more unsettling, since my faith teaches that in Christ God has reconciled my offender and me to each other, I have to think of us as already in some sense reconciled. That seems preposterous! But then I remind myself that when you wronged me you sinned most egregiously not against me but against God, and God forgave you of that sin just as God forgave me of my sin. Then remembering your wrongdoing as forgiven by God helps me to forgive it myself. And then remembering our reconciliation by God in Christ helps me to reconcile with you face-to-face.”

“It sounds like the Christian faith works for you. And we did make some progress this time,” he observed.

Captain G. and I parted amicably, but I knew I’d have questions in his absence – questions about how genuine and above all how deep this reconciliation was. But for the time being I was pleased with what happened. So went the best-case scenario I played out in my head.

Progress Report on Site Rebuild

I appreciate everyone’s patience with the rebuild process. Substantive progress is being made and we hope to have all major resources and blog posts re-entered in the next week or so.

The last part of the site to be re-established will be the on-line, self-scoring evaluations. From what we can tell, it was uploading new editions of these resources that created the crash. We want to make sure we do not create a another window of time when resources are unavailable by uploading these again before we understand what the compatibility issue may have been.

Again, thank you for your patience.

Marriage Resources Available from The Summit Church

On the weekend of May 2-3, 2015 our pastor, J.D. Greear, delivered an excellent message on marriage, divorce, and remarriage. Doubtless, this message raised many questions for members of our congregation. We wanted to make you aware of resources that are available to you as you seek live out the implications of this message in our own life.

For the various counseling options available from this material visit www.summitrdu.com/counseling.

We will divide the resources listed below into three categories:

  1. Marital Enrichment: These are resources for couples whose relationship is functioning relatively well but want to enhance their marriage so that is does not casually drift into disrepair. These resources are intended marital enhancement and for mild to moderate marital struggles.
  2. Marital Restoration: These are resources for couples who relationship is facing significant challenges due to major forms of dishonor within the marriage. These resources are intended for moderate to severe marital struggles.
  3. Divorce or Widow Recovery: These are resources for spouse’s who are grieving the loss of their marriage to death or divorce.

Marriage Enrichment

The five seminars linked below are from Summit’s “Creating a Gospel-Centered Marriage” seminar series. Dates for live presentations of these events can always be found at bradhambrick.com/events.

After each listing is a series of questions is provided to let you know what is addressed in that seminar.

Foundations

Why is marriage hard? Why do so many marriages that begin in sincere love end in divorce? What are the essential things a couple should focus on in order to have a marriage that flourishes? What is a covenant, and why is marriage a covenant? Why do we have a marriage ceremony? What are the roles for a Christian husband and wife? What if I don’t “fit” the masculine-feminine stereotypes or don’t have the personality to match a “traditional” husband/wife?

Listening Guide: GCM_Foundations_ListeningGuide_3.1

Communication

What does a couple talk about over a life time? What if I’m not good with words or listening? How do we maintain friendship when we’re having to keep up with so many logistics? How do we disagree and protect our marriage without losing what’s important to each of us individually? Why do words matter so much, and why can they hurt so badly? How do we make things right after they go wrong and not let negative momentum build?

Listening Guide: GCM_Communication_Listening Guide_3.1

Finances

Why are money problems the number one cause of divorce? How do we maintain reasonable expectations for money in a debt-sick culture? How do two people manage their money together when it is hard enough to manage as a single person? Who should administrate the finances, and how involved should the other person be? How do we learn self-control and contentment as a couple? How can “budget” become an exciting or, at least, pleasant word?

Listening Guide: GCM_Finances_Listening Guide_2.0

Decision Making

How do we manage our time? How do we navigate situations where we each want good things that cannot both happen? How do we determine God’s will for our personal and marital lives? How do we functionally express the biblical roles of headship and submission? How do we ensure that life’s tough decisions draw us closer to God and each other instead of creating distance? How do we respond when bad things happen to a good marriage?

Listening Guide: GCM_Decision Making_Listening Guide_2.0

Intimacy

How do you maintain the “spark” of marriage over a lifetime? How do you continue learning each other without feeling like you know all there is to know? How do we protect our expectations from highly romanticized cultural ideals? How many ways are there to express love, and why are they all necessary? How do we enjoy a balance of both intimacy and intercourse? How do we grow as lovers throughout our marriage?

Listening Guide: GCM_Intimacy_Listening Guide_3.1

Marriage Restoration

True Betrayal: Overcoming the Betrayal of Your Spouse’s Sexual Sin

“True Betrayal” contains three hours of presentation divided into a nine step model of responding to the suffering created by a spouse’s sexual sin. Practical guidance is provided for this difficult and often isolating journey. This seminar is most effective when studies with a friend, counselor, or small group.

Listening Guide: True Betrayal Listening Guide

False Love: Overcoming Sexual Sin from Pornography to Adultery

“False Love” contains three hours of presentation divided into a nine step model of overcoming sexual sin. Sexual sin is examined from private lust, pornography, emotional affairs, to adultery in marriage. This seminar is most effective when studies with a friend, counselor, or small group.

Listening Guide: False Love Listening Guide

Supplemental Blog: How to End and Extra-Marital Relationship

Supplemental Blog: How to Talk to Children When Sexual Sin Effects the Family

Self-Centered Spouse

We are all married to a self-centered spouse. That is what it means for us to be fallen people who are bound to experience life from within our bodies. But there are cases where this “general self-centeredness” becomes chronic — severe to a point that it either results in a marital environment of abuse or neglect.

Scripture speaks to both “garden variety” marriage struggles and chronic self-centered marriage struggles, but it speaks to these varying degrees of struggles in different ways. This is no different from saying that Scripture speaks to both impulse control and addiction, but speaks to them differently.

However, Christians have not always done a good job of assessing the differences in these marriage situations and defining the approaches that need to be taken.  Working from Jesus’ words in Matthew 7:1-6 (utilizing his instruction in verse 6 as applying to cases of chronic relational offense) we will examine the subject of “Marriage with a Chronically Self-Centered Spouse” in 17 posts cataloged in the link above.

A refined, published form of this material in available in booklet form at amazon and Summit Next Step areas at each campus.

Divorce or Widow Recovery

Taking the Journey of Grief with Hope

This seminar contains three hours of presentation divided into a nine step model of facing the suffering of a major loss. This seminar is meant to help you process the death of a loved one, miscarriage, or losses not often associated with grief (health, job, stability, divorce, or a dream). This seminar is most effective when studies with a friend, counselor, or small group.

Listening Guide: Journey of Grief_Listening Guide_2.0

DivorceCare

Church Initiative provides many excellent curriculum to help church members care well for one another. I have had the privilege of being a part of their DivorceCare and GriefShare curriculums. The link above provides access for you to find a group near you.

For the various counseling options available from this material visit www.summitrdu.com/counseling.

 

We Are Experiencing Technical Difficulties

We have experienced a site crash and are seeking to identify remedies. I apologize for the period of time in which resources will be unavailable and am working diligently to get the site to it previous condition. We hope to have the resources previously available at bradhambrick.com available soon. Thank you for your patience.

Many links you may have previously used will not be operational until the site restoration process is complete. But all links should be operational once the site is restored.

Update (April 29, 2015): Progress continues to be made. Thank you for your continued patience.