Tweets of the Week 2.10.16

There is great value in saying something in a memorable, concise manner. Twitter has caused us to make this a near spiritual discipline. For my own growth (as a generally verbose individual… that’s a long way of saying “wordy”) and for the benefit of others, I highlight tweets each week that deliver a big message in a few words.

Video: Gaining a Healthy Relationship with Food (Step Six)

Below is a video from the presentation of “Gaining a Healthy Relationship with Food.” For the various counseling options available from this material visit www.summitrdu.com/counseling.

NOTE: Many people have asked how they can get a copy of the seminar notebook referenced in this verbal presentation. Summit members can pick up a copy of the notebook in the church office. For those outside the Summit family, you can request a copy from Summit’s admin over counseling at counseling@summitrdu.com (please note this is an administrative account; no individual or family counsel is provided through e-mail).

“I Want to Steward My Life; Not Wrestle a Scale”
RESTRUCTURE MY LIFE to rely on God’s grace and Word to transform my life.

Ganing A Healthy Relationship With Food — Step 6 from The Sam James Institute on Vimeo.

Resource: Healthy Food Thoughts Journaling Tool

Memorize: 1 Timothy 4:8 (ESV), “For while bodily training is of some value, godliness is of value in every way, as it holds promise for the present life and also for the life to come.” As you memorize this passage reflect upon these key points:

  • “Bodily training” – God likes your body and wants you to care for it as the good gift he intended it to be.
  • “Some value” – The effort you put into caring for your body is not wasted; God places value on those efforts.
  • “Godliness” – You character is what determines whether your physique is a blessing or bondage.
  • “In Every Way” – Godliness is what allows us to savor every blessing that God bestows without excess or neglect.
  • “Present life and.. life to come” – Character enrichment is not just heaven-preparation but also vital to a happy life.

Teaching Notes

“I sensed a stronger resistance to impatience, lust, and other sins. Confronting excessive, indulgent eating was almost like taking spiritual penicillin or antibiotics and that it seemed to cut the feet out from under other demands (p. 61)… Obesity is ‘socially contagious.’ Your social environment has a tremendous impact on your own journey of either gaining or losing weight (p. 92).” Gary Thomas in Every Body Matters: Strengthening Your Body to Strengthen Your Soul

“The enemy of our souls wants to discourage us from ever thinking we could have a supernatural self-control (p. 31)… Research tells us that people become more successful at long-term weight loss when their motivation is to become healthier, not thinner (p. 34).” Stephen Arterburn and Linda Mintle in Lose It for Life

“I used to carry my food plan home with me on a piece of paper. If I had not, I would never have remembered what I was supposed to eat. I even recorded what I ate every day in a food journal. The rigidity was necessary in the beginning in order to get me on the right track (p. 42)… A true test of my recovery has been feeling overweight and still eating breakfast, lunch, and dinner (p. 68).” Jenni Schaeffer in Life Without Ed

“In the past, when I’ve read the diet books, I frequently skipped right to the eating plan so I could get to the store and buy the food on the list and get going. I usually didn’t care why I should eat and ways the author said; I just wanted to get going on losing some weight (p. 97).” Elyse Fitzpatrick in Love to Eat, Hate to Eat

“The most valuable lesson I learned was how to listen to my own body (p. 122).” Sheryle Cruse in Thin Enough: My Spiritual Journey through the Living Death of an Eating Disorder

“Part of your recovery will be developing your own line or limits where you are no longer willing to betray yourself to ‘fix’ or change your body (p. 71).” Carolyn Costin & Gwen Schubert Grabb in 8 Keys to Recovery from an Eating Disorder

“I used my cravings for food as a prompt to pray. It was my way of tearing down the tower of impossibility before me in building something new (p. 30)… We can step on the scale and accept the numbers for what they are—an indication of how much our body weights—and not an indication of our worth (p. 74).” Lysa Terkeurst in Made to Crave

“I have these boundaries in place not for restriction but to define the parameters of my freedom. My brokenness can’t handle more freedom than this right now. And I’m good with that (p. 153).” Lysa Terkeurst in Made to Crave

 

Counseling Triage: Where to Begin with Complex Struggles (Expanded Post)

This post is an expansion of an original post by the same title. This post is also an excerpt from an upcoming workshop on counseling in the local church.

COUNSELING IN YOUR LOCAL CHURCH:
Understanding the Liabilities & Possibilities of Lay Care Ministries
Date: Friday February 19, 2016
Time: 9am to 5pm
Location: The Summit Church, Brier Creek Campus
Address: 2335 Presidential Drive; Durham, NC 27703
Cost: $99 / person (lunch provided)
RSVP and Find More Information Here

In life and counseling, finding the starting point can be difficult. Life is fluid enough that identifying where to begin with a life-dominating or complex struggle can feel like finding the beginning of a circle. In order to help you with this very important question, a five-level triage progression is outlined below.

A struggle in one of the higher categories may have many expressions or contributing causes in the lower categories. For example, someone who is suicidal (level one – safety concern) may need to learn to manage their finances better (level five – skill concern) because pending bankruptcy fuels their sense of hopelessness.

However, unless the upper level concerns are addressed first, efforts at change have a low probability of lasting success. The individual above needs to be stabilized before they would be able to implement a budget or debt-reduction plan. Similarly, a person with a substance abuse problem (level two – addiction concern) may have anger management issues (level four – character concern), but until the abuse of a mind-mood altering substance is removed attempts at learning emotional regulation and how to honor others in times of disappointment will be short-lived.

This is why the higher concerns are recommended to be addressed first and significant progress to be made in those areas before beginning to focus on the lower level concerns.

One final point before we examine five levels of triage. In the higher categories denial is likely to be a stronger complicating factor. For example: abusers (level one), addicts (level two), and those who have been traumatized (level three) are very prone to deny or minimize the impact of their struggle. The benefit of this tool is that it provides a reasonable system to appeal to in order to help these individuals see why it is not sufficient to just “be nicer” (level four) and learn to “do better” (level five).

1. Safety

When the basic requirements of safety are not present, then safety takes priority over any other concern. Safety is never an “unfair expectation” from a relationship. If safety is a concern, then you should immediately involve necessary authorities or advisors (i.e., pastor, counselor, parents of a minor, or legal authorities).

This category includes: thoughts of suicide, violence, threats of violence (to people or pets), preventing someone from moving freely in their home, destruction of property, manipulation, coercion, and similar practices.

Until safety is no longer in doubt other concerns should only be as a way of understanding how to create a safe disposition or environment for the individual.

Sample Dialogue: “I hear you talking about how hard it is for you to live realizing how much pain you’ve caused your family. It makes sense why that is so overwhelming and I think it is important for us to discuss how to process the shame and despair you feel. But I want to make sure our conversation does not add to your sense that life is not worth living. Can we take a break from talking about what has happened and what you fear having to do about it in order to remember / talk about why suicide is not an answer?

Sample Dialogue: “I can tell you’re very upset about the ways you believe your wife disrespects you, but in describing that, you’ve mentioned several things that are concerning: striking her face when she “back-talked,” not allowing a conversation to end when she asked for a break after an hour of escalating argument, and punishing her by not allowing her to have access to transportation or talking to her parents. These behaviors are abusive. They raise concerns of safety which supersede concerns of disrespect. The way you describe her offensive actions as ‘causing’ (and by implication ‘excusing’) your dangerous actions, indicates that your personal lack of self-control is a greater concern than the relational differences that exist in your marriage.

2. Substance Abuse / Addiction

After safety, the use of mind or mood altering substances is the next level of priority concern. Substance abuse makes an individual’s life situation worse and inhibits any maturation process. The consistency and stability required for lasting change are disrupted by substance abuse.

This category includes: alcohol, illegal drugs, prescription drugs not used according to instructions, inhalants, driving any vehicle with any impairment for any distance, and similar activities.

Sample Dialogue: “It is good that you want to learn how to manage conflict better with your spouse, but when you’ve described your arguments they are usually in the evening when you’ve been drinking. It seems you ‘have a drink’ more nights than you do not and this leads to much of the conflict with your spouse. Several times you’ve blamed what you’ve said as being excessive because you ‘had too much to drink that night.’ It is doubtful that you will practice the self-control necessary to engage conflict well as long as you abuse alcohol in the way you do. For this reason, if you are serious about your desire to manage conflict better, then you will need to address your substance abuse problem.

Sample Dialogue: “I admire the courage you show in wanting to learn how to handle the emotions associated with losing your child in a traffic accident. The fear, anxiety, anger, and confusion you describe are very understandable. But it concerns me how much you are using alcohol to cope with this experience. One of the effects of escaping emotions through alcohol is that it stunts our ability to mature though those experiences. An important part of processing this experience healthily will be to forego the escapist coping mechanism of alcohol.

3. Trauma

Past or present events resulting in nightmares, sleeplessness, flashbacks, sense of helplessness, restricted emotional expression, difficulty concentrating, high levels of anxiety, intense feelings of shame, or a strong desire to isolate should be dealt with before trying to refine matters of character or skill.

Trauma is a form of suffering that negatively shapes someone’s sense of identity and causes them to begin to constantly expect or brace against the worst.

This category includes: any physical or sexual abuse, significant verbal or emotional abuse, exposure to an act of violence, experience of a disaster, a major loss, or similar experience.

Sample Dialogue: “I hear what you’re describing about the changes in your marriage and job satisfaction over the last year. But I cannot help but notice how that correlates with when you lost your father, whom you mentioned being very close to. You also mentioned how busy the time around his death was because you were responsible to administrate his will. It seems you may have started ‘being strong because you had to’ (which meant ignoring / turning off your emotions) and now you’re struggling to feel anything for your spouse or job. I think it would be unwise to make any decisions in those areas until you allowed yourself to grieve the loss of your father.

Sample Dialogue: “I admire your desire to become ‘a more positive person’ and willingness to acknowledge how your pessimism may be impacting the sense of security in your children. But what you’re calling ‘being negative’ or ‘anxiety’ seems to be hypervigilance – a natural response to a trauma like what happened when you lost everything in the house fire last year. I believe the most effective way to shape your character in the way you desire is to understand the impact of the trauma you and your children went through, so that you do not try to ‘just be stronger’ in a way that makes your normal response to a tragedy seem like a moral defect in your character.

4. Character

This refers to persistent dispositions that express themselves in a variety of ways in a variety of settings. Because both the “trigger” and manifestation change regularly and hide when convenient, it is clear that the struggle lies within the core values, beliefs, and priorities of the individual.

Skill training alone will not change character. If character concerns exist, then teaching skills without addressing the core values of an individual tends to result in change that only lasts as long as the consequences of misbehaving are greater than the probability of misbehaving being seen.

This category includes: anger, bitterness, fear, greed, jealousy, obsessions, hoarding, envy, laziness, selfishness, pornography, codependency, depression, social anxiety, insecurity, and similar dispositions.

Sample Dialogue: “It’s great that you recognize how over-committed you are and how that leads to a great deal of personal stress and sometimes even lying to your friends about what you haven’t done. But learning how to be more efficient with your time is only going to help if you are willing to tell people ‘no.’ I get the sense that you want to become so efficient that you never have to tell anyone ‘no.’ If that’s the case, then I wouldn’t be helping you by teaching you how I approach projects. I think it would be better for us to discuss how I handle the idea of disappointing people.

Sample Dialogue: “It takes a great deal of courage to admit you need to become a less controlling person. But the kinds of questions you’re asking center on the ‘rules of relationship – what you can and cannot expect from others without being considered controlling.’ If we engage that conversation, I’ll just be helping you become a controlling-person-no-one-is-allowed-to-be-upset-with. It seems to me you are depending too much on those you consider a ‘best friend’ for your sense of security. As long as that is the case, even reasonable expectations will carry too much weight for you and friendship will be strained by your response to the normal short-comings of imperfect people.

5. Skill

With skill level changes there will usually be a high degree of self-awareness that change is needed in the moment when change is needed. However, confusion or uncertainty prevents an individual from being able to respond in a manner that it is wise and appropriate.

This category includes: conflict resolution, time management, budgeting, planning, and similar skills.

Sample Dialogue:[1] “I hear your concern that, as a parent, your anxiety may be negatively affecting your children. But you’ve described how your children feel safe bringing their fears to you without feeling like burden to you. You seem to be able to enjoy times of playing with your children and allowing your children to take appropriate risks in their play. For these reasons and until these things change, I think it is sufficient for us to help you identify outlets to discuss and address your anxieties so that you are not ruminating on them.”

Sample Dialogue: “I can understand why you are upset with yourself for frequently being late and upsetting your friends. It’s good that you’re willing to address this pattern, but I’m not sure it means you’re an abusive person or chronic liar. It seems that you’re an extrovert who gets so lost in one moment you lose any sense of what’s next. If this is accurate, then we can begin by learning some scheduling or time management techniques. If this resolves the problem, then this is just a strength-weakness of your personality of which you need to be aware and manage well.”

[1] The “sample dialogues” for this section will have a different tone because they assume the individual is trying to address the problem as a higher level concern instead of minimizing the problem. Use these dialogues as a sample of how you would speak if a friend was trying to exaggerate one of the mid-level concerns in this triage model.

Tweets of the Week 2.3.16

There is great value in saying something in a memorable, concise manner. Twitter has caused us to make this a near spiritual discipline. For my own growth (as a generally verbose individual… that’s a long way of saying “wordy”) and for the benefit of others, I highlight tweets each week that deliver a big message in a few words.

Video: Gaining a Healthy Relationship with Food (Step Five)

Below is a video from the presentation of “Gaining a Healthy Relationship with Food.” For the various counseling options available from this material visit www.summitrdu.com/counseling.

NOTE: Many people have asked how they can get a copy of the seminar notebook referenced in this verbal presentation. Summit members can pick up a copy of the notebook in the church office. For those outside the Summit family, you can request a copy from Summit’s admin over counseling at counseling@summitrdu.com (please note this is an administrative account; no individual or family counsel is provided through e-mail).

“My Unhealthy Relationship with Food
Led to an Unhealthy Relationship with You”
CONFESS TO THOSE AFFECTED for harm done and seek to make amends.

Ganing A Healthy Relationship With Food — Step 5 from The Sam James Institute on Vimeo.

For the “Confession Guide” click here: Confession Guide

Memorize: I John 1:6-10 (ESV), “If we say, we have fellowship with him while we walk in darkness, we lie and do not practice the truth. But if we walk in the light, as he is in the light, we have fellowship with one another, and the blood of Jesus his Son cleanses us from all sin. If we say we have no sin, we deceive ourselves and the truth is not in us. If we confess our sin, he is faithful and just to forgive our sins and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness. If we say we have not sinned, we make him a liar, and his word is not in us.” As you memorize this passage reflect upon these key points:

  • “If we say” – Part of your confession needs to acknowledge that verses six and eight were true of you.
  • “Walk in darkness” – It is important not to see your disordered eating as “the good life,” but as destructive.
  • “Walk in the light” – True confession is a lifestyle and not an event; not just something to “get it over with.”
  • “Deceive ourselves” – Begin to see how you deceived yourself as the first step in being dishonest with others.
  • “Make [God] a liar” – When we refuse to acknowledge the wrongness of our disordered eating we call God a liar.

Teaching Notes

“Disclosure was the next step in my recovery process (p. 134)… I saw the eating disorder issue as a giant balloon. Little by little, as I told the truth to more people, I was deflating it (p. 155).” Sheryle Cruse in Thin Enough: My Spiritual Journey through the Living Death of an Eating Disorder

“But I had allowed my world to become so small, so isolated, due in large part to my controlling need for self-protection. That left little room for anyone to get into my life. But now, desiring change and a closer relationship with God, I had to get used to people again. I had to get used to and knowing people and being known by them (p. 174-175).” Sheryle Cruse in Thin Enough: My Spiritual Journey through the Living Death of an Eating Disorder

“I learned that I could tell people the truth and they would love me more, not less, so I reached out to others to help me (p. 5)…  I realize that by not talking to anyone about my fear of the unknown, my deep-seated insecurities, and my desperate need to feel more in control, I was actually fueling and protecting my eating disorder (p. 25).” Carolyn Costin & Gwen Schubert Grabb in 8 Keys to Recovery from an Eating Disorder

“Eating disorders are emotional time bombs because all emotions are put on hold so that the person can concentrate solely on food. They also act as time bombs in our relationships. Other people cease to be as important as the relationship with food. Food becomes a secret friend or a hated enemy that no one else can understand (p. 26).” Gregory Jantz in Hope, Help, & Healing for Eating Disorders

“Central to healing is being able to focus outside yourself, to reduce your level of self-absorption. Being able to look at others as allies instead of competitors or enemies is vital to grasping reality. Not only do these attitudes allow you to see the world as it really is—and yourself as others see you—but they help you find other people who can interact with you, providing you with the support you need on your journey (p. 112).” Gregory Jantz in Hope, Help, & Healing for Eating Disorders

“Ed wanted me to lie to everyone who is closest to me (p. 25).” Jenni Schaeffer in Life Without Ed

My Favorite Posts on Communication

The “My Favorite Posts” series on my blog is how I catalog posts I’ve written to help my readers find the material that is the best-fit for their interest or need. I hope this series creates a more user-friendly experience for my readers and allows this site to become a trusted resource hub for the church.

Video Resources

Evaluations

Blog Posts

Recommended Books

Tweets of the Week 1.27.16

There is great value in saying something in a memorable, concise manner. Twitter has caused us to make this a near spiritual discipline. For my own growth (as a generally verbose individual… that’s a long way of saying “wordy”) and for the benefit of others, I highlight tweets each week that deliver a big message in a few words.

Video: Gaining a Healthy Relationship with Food (Step Four)

Below is a video from the presentation of “Gaining a Healthy Relationship with Food.” For the various counseling options available from this material visit www.summitrdu.com/counseling.

NOTE: Many people have asked how they can get a copy of the seminar notebook referenced in this verbal presentation. Summit members can pick up a copy of the notebook in the church office. For those outside the Summit family, you can request a copy from Summit’s admin over counseling at counseling@summitrdu.com (please note this is an administrative account; no individual or family counsel is provided through e-mail).

 “God, You are More Satisfying than Being Thin”
REPENT TO GOD for how my sin replaced and misrepresented Him.

Ganing A Healthy Relationship With Food — Step 4 from The Sam James Institute on Vimeo.

Memorize: Acts 3:19-20 (ESV), “Repent therefore, and turn back, that your sins may be blotted out, that times of refreshing may come from the presence of the Lord, and that he may send the Christ appointed for you, Jesus.” As you memorize this passage reflect upon these key points:

  • “Repent… turn back” – The core meaning of “repent” is not “feel very bad” but “make a U-turn” back to God.
  • “Blotted out” – God has no intention of shaming you with your sin. Instead, he wants to free you from false idols.
  • “Times of refreshing” – Our anticipation of repentance should feel like the longing for a refreshing bath.
  • “The presence of the Lord” – Repentance is what reconnects us with the source of our strength and hope.
  • “May send the Christ” – Repentance unlocks the door of our life to unleash the return of the hero, Christ.

Teaching Notes

“So I go to war against gluttony and indulgence, not because I want God to love me more, but because God, who already loves me perfectly, warns me that gluttony and excess are my enemies– regardless of how good they may sometimes feel. I go to war against gluttony, not to build a body that others admire, but to maintain a soul ‘prepared to do any good work’ that God can use to bless others (p. 88).” Gary Thomas in Every Body Matters: Strengthening Your Body to Strengthen Your Soul

“I had to, in short, practice being loved by God (p. 176).” Sheryle Cruse in Thin Enough: My Spiritual Journey through the Living Death of an Eating Disorder

“As long as you believe that changing something on your outside will solve the problem on the inside, the deeper issues will stay hidden and unresolved (p. 109)… You need to turn to someone who offers a better relationship than the one you have with your eating disorder (p. 191).” Carolyn Costin & Gwen Schubert Grabb in 8 Keys to Recovery from an Eating Disorder

“Women turn to food when they are not hungry because they are hungry for something they can’t name; a connection to what is beyond the daily concerns of life. Something deathless, something sacred. But replacing the hunger for divine connection with Double Stuffed Oreos is like giving a glass of sand to a person dying of thirst. It creates more thirst, more panic. Combine the butter and efficacy of dieting with the lack of spiritual awareness and we have generations of mad, ravenous, self-loathing women (p. 219).” Geneen Roth in Women, Food, and God as quoted in Carolyn Costin & Gwen Schubert Grabb in 8 Keys to Recovery from an Eating Disorder

“Positive guilt is the sense of shame that we feel when we are stepping outside the bounds of what is familiar, when we are breaking the old rules… Positive guilt is guilt we feel when we are breaking rules that need to be broken (p. 99).” Jenni Schaeffer in Life Without Ed

“Repentance is also required and that the client, through spiritual pride, has concluded, ‘I must handle life on my own. I cannot trust God nor will I be dependent on him. I must take control.’ This position, born out of pain, confronts the reality that control is elusive… Belief in self-sufficiency ends in continual striving. Anorexia is a misguided attempt to be self-sufficient; bulimia utilizes self-striving in an effort to gain control (p. 324-325).” Linda Mintle in “Eating Disorders” in Caring for People God’s Way edited by Tim Clinton, et al

My Favorite Posts on Theology and Counseling

The “My Favorite Posts” series on my blog is how I catalog posts I’ve written to help my readers find the material that is the best-fit for their interest or need. I hope this series creates a more user-friendly experience for my readers and allows this site to become a trusted resource hub for the church.

Book Recommendations:

Video: Gaining a Healthy Relationship with Food (Step Three)

Below is a video from the presentation of “Gaining a Healthy Relationship with Food.” For the various counseling options available from this material visit www.summitrdu.com/counseling.

NOTE: Many people have asked how they can get a copy of the seminar notebook referenced in this verbal presentation. Summit members can pick up a copy of the notebook in the church office. For those outside the Summit family, you can request a copy from Summit’s admin over counseling at counseling@summitrdu.com (please note this is an administrative account; no individual or family counsel is provided through e-mail).

“Why Did Meals Become the Battle of My Soul?”
UNDERSTAND the origin, motive, and history of my disordered eating.

Ganing A Healthy Relationship With Food — Step 3 from The Sam James Institute on Vimeo.

Resource: Disordered Eating Journaling Tool

Memorize: I Corinthians 10:31 (ESV), “So, whether you eat or drink, or whatever you do, do all to the glory of God.” As you memorize this passage reflect upon these key points:

  • “So” – Paul is adjudicating a debate over whether to eat food that had been sacrificed to idols.
  • “Whether” – Paul chooses not to settle the debate by making “food rules” but by appealing to motives.
  • “Eat or drink” – God leaves the choices that will change your relationship with food fully in your hands.
  • “Whatever you do” – Paul is going to say that there is only one motive that frees us from the tyranny of self.
  • “to the glory of God” – That one motive is to connect our actions to the larger purpose of glorifying God.

Teaching Notes

“Whether real or imagined, conscious or not, in one way or another, you’re eating disorder serves a purpose or function for you (p. 216)… On the other hand, if you have anorexia or are very restrictive with food, you are more likely to experience satisfaction, or even pride, in your ability to control your food intake in your weight (p. 39).” Carolyn Costin & Gwen Schubert Grabb in 8 Keys to Recovery from an Eating Disorder

“When I was in the depths of my eating disorder, ‘I’m thin’ used to be my answer to all of life’s tough questions. Am I happy? Yes, I’m thin. Am I a good performer? Sure, I’m thin. Am I confident? Of course, I’m thin. As long as I was thin, I did not really have to think about anything else (p. 81).” Jenni Schaeffer in Life Without Ed

“The problem with the therapeutic model—eating and exercise to look good and feel better—is that everything is related to self: ‘I shouldn’t over eat because it will make me less healthy.’ ‘I should exercise because I don’t want to become weak and lose my breath climbing up the stairs.’ Talking about discipleship brings God back into the picture: ‘I shouldn’t over eat because God tells me not to, and it dishonors him as Lord when I disobey, and I want to be as strong as possible to serve him as best I can’ (p. 48).” Gary Thomas in Every Body Matters: Strengthening Your Body to Strengthen Your Soul

“Food was my comfort. Food was my reward. Food was my joy. Food was what I turn to in times of stress, sadness, and even in times of happiness (p. 29)… Idolatry, in the case of food, means the consumption of ill-sized portions and unhealthy choices because we feel like we deserve it or needed to feel better (p. 159).” Lysa Terkeurst in Made to Crave

“We can assure you that people who learn to respond to emotional difficulties without using food to numb or escape feelings have a better and longer weight loss maintenance record than those who only deal with eating and exercise (p. 153).” Stephen Arterburn and Linda Mintle in Lose It for Life

“Idols create laws that multiplied exponentially (p. 174)… The Law of Diminishing Returns is in full force in idol worship. The behavior will grow and grow until it completely consumes you and you spend your entire life compulsively overeating, binging, purging, or starving. Your god has an insatiable hunger—and if you feed him, he’ll grow (p. 180).” Elyse Fitzpatrick in Love to Eat, Hate to Eat

“At this point, I became obsessed with self-protection, self-preservation. Funny, huh? I was basically near death, and yet I saw self-preservation as maintaining control (p. 48).” Sheryle Cruse in Thin Enough: My Spiritual Journey through the Living Death of an Eating Disorder