Tweets of the Week 1.27.15

There is great value in saying something in a memorable, concise manner. Twitter has caused us to make this a near spiritual discipline. For my own growth (as a generally verbose individual… that’s a long way of saying “wordy”) and for the benefit of others, I highlight tweets each week that deliver a big message in a few words.

Video: Overcoming Depression-Anxiety, A Responsibility Paradigm (Step 3)

Below is a videos from the presentation of “Overcoming Depression-Anxiety: A Personal Responsibility Paradigm.” For the various counseling options available from this material visit www.summitrdu.com/counseling.

The complementing studies  Overcoming Depression-Anxiety: A Suffering Paradigm and Towards a Christian Perspective of Mental Illness will also available in a video format after their presentation

NOTE: Many people have asked how they can get a copy of the seminar notebook referenced in this verbal presentation. Summit members can pick up a copy of the notebook in the church office. For those outside the Summit family, you can request a copy from Amy LaBarr (alabarr@summitrdu.com), office administrator over counseling.

“Where Does My Fear-Despair Come From?”
UNDERSTAND the origin, motive, and history of my sin.

Depression-Anxiety Responsibility Paradigm Step 3 from The Sam James Institute on Vimeo.

Memorize: John 14:1 (ESV), “Let not your hearts be troubled. Believe in God; believe also in me.” As you memorize this passage reflect upon these key points:

  • “Context” – Jesus was aware that his disciples were troubled, and he comforts them rather than scolds them.
  • “Let not” – Jesus points out the influence the disciples had over their emotions as part of his comfort to them.
  • “Your heart” – Jesus identifies the heart (i.e., the “self” we refer to as our mind) as where our fear-despair resides.
  • “Be troubled” – Troubled is a good description to capture the experience of both depression and anxiety.
  • “Believe” – Our thoughts and values are a primary battle field on which we engage depression-anxiety.

Teaching Notes

“Our emotions tell us what we really, really believe (p. 128).” Brian Borgman in Feelings and Faith

“Fear and anxiety make a prediction… We fancy ourselves as prophets, and we keep trusting in our predictions even though they don’t come to pass. Fear and worry are prophecies (p. 9).” Ed Welch in When I Am Afraid

“As physicians are prone to say, it can be as important to know what type of person has the disease as what disease the person has (p. 121).” Mark Yarhouse, Richard Butman, and Barrett McRay in Modern Psychopathologies: A Comprehensive Christian Appraisal

“The challenge is placed for me therefore to look to my own heart and see if this is the case for me [emotions having their root in sin]. Maybe my doctors would look at the question this way: to what extent do your desires and fears and activities trip you up so as to let mental illness gain a foothold? Maybe where they would say desires, I would say misplaced desires; where they would say fears, I would say faithless fears; where they say activities, I would say disobedient acts (p. 108)… I find it hard to believe that a biological deficit in my brain could make me more of the center than I already am (p. 109).” Kathryn Greene-McCreight in Darkness Is My Only Companion

“Much of the increase in depression and anxiety today is largely the result of an unbalanced lifestyle where people are, on the one hand, working too hard and spending too much and, on the other hand, are exercising, resting, and sleeping too little (p. 55).” David Murray in Christians Get Depressed Too

“People who believe they should be better than they are can’t be happy, because they are morbidly preoccupied with themselves (p. 26)… We will always be disappointed with life (or others) when we ask it to do something it wasn’t designed to do (p. 34)… When we put our hope in or expect something or someone other than him to fill us and make us happy, he will surely frustrate us. But he doesn’t do it to punish us. He does it to rescue us from our disordered attachments and delusions, and from ourselves (p. 35).” Leslie Vernick in Lord, I Just Want to Be Happy

“We can all too easily confuse what we desire with what is desirable, satisfy the superficial and starve the essential traits of our nature, love absolutely what we should love relatively, and love relatively what we should love absolutely. We can be on a fool’s errand after fool’s gold (p. 22).” David Naugle in Reordered Love, Reordered Lives

Dr. Benjamin T. Mast on Philippians 2 and Caring for a Loved One with Alzheimer’s Disease

mastThis blog is an excerpt from Dr. Benjamin T. Mast new book Second Forgetting: Remembering the Power of the Gospel during Alzheimer’s Disease. This is an important but neglected topic.

Benjamin Mast is an Associate Professor in the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences and an Associate Clinical Professor in Geriatric Medicine at the University of Louisville. He is a licensed clinical psychologist specializing in aging, Alzheimer’s disease, and dementia related issues. He is Co-Editor in Chief of the forthcoming American Psychological Association Handbook of Clinical Geropsychology (February 2015).

“Through the personal stories of those affected and the loved ones who care for them, Dr. Benjamin Mast highlights the power of the gospel for those suffering from Alzheimer’s disease. Filled with helpful, up-to-date information, Dr. Mast answers common questions about the disease and its effect on personal identity and faith as he explores the biblical importance of remembering and God’s commitment to not forget his people. In addition, he gives practical suggestions for how the church can come alongside families and those struggling, offering help and hope to victims of this debilitating disease.” From Amazon.com book description

—–

second forgettingThe way of Christ—the way of love—turns our natural selfish tendencies upside down. Jesus tells us that the pursuit of greatness is not found in pleasing ourselves but in being a humble servant of others. Jesus taught that those who seek to exalt themselves will one day be humbled, while those who humble themselves in service today will be exalted one day (Matthew 23:12). Philippians 2 also encourages us to imitate Christ in his humility and servant nature:

In humility value others above yourselves, not looking to your own interests but each of you to the interests of the others. In your relationships with one another, have the same mindset as Christ Jesus: Who, being in very nature God, did not consider equality with God some- thing to be used to his own advantage; rather, he made himself nothing by taking the very nature of a servant.” (vv. 3 – 7; italics added)

If you find yourself feeling burdened, worn out, discouraged, or even humiliated by the tasks you’ve taken on as a caregiver, remember the example of Christ. He was the lowliest of servants when he walked upon the earth. Yet today and for all eternity he is exalted above all others. And he promises this to us as well. Remember his promises to you as you serve a person who may never thank you or even realize how much you do for them. You are following your Savior and you can take heart in the faithfulness you show in providing care for those who are vulnerable. You don’t need to be ashamed of the things you do for another. You can rejoice in
your lowly position, knowing what
 God has promised.

One caregiver, referring to Jesus’ acts of humble service, told me, “If my Lord, who spoke this world into existence, was not above washing the feet of his followers, I can follow him by bathing Mom and wiping the food she dribbles.” Providing care for someone with dementia probably wasn’t in your future plans. Most likely, it interferes with other things you want or need to do: working at your job, taking care of your children, spending time with your spouse, or even doing things that you enjoy. When you become a caregiver, you sacrifice aspects of yourself to give to another. But remember this: God may have interrupted your plans to teach and form you into the person he wants you to be. He interrupts our lives for reasons we don’t always understand. What seem to us to be frustrations and irritations can actually be the work of God, molding and shaping us into the image of Christ. The words of Dietrich Bonhoeffer are particularly appropriate as we think about the humility needed to serve others: “Nobody is too good for the lowest service…. We must be ready to allow ourselves to be interrupted by God, who will thwart our plans and frustrate our ways time and again, even daily, by sending people across our path with their demands and requests.”2

So what might God be teaching us? How does he form us through the experience of caregiving?

ReCity: An RDU Non-Profit You Should Know

recity logoReCity is a 501 c 3 educational non-profit that is reimagining what our city would look like if we lived our lives together instead of separately. ReCity’s vision is to see every student in the Triangle connected to the opportunities they need to thrive. By leveraging the assets of the community and partnering with already existing organizations, ReCity creates access to education and career opportunities for disconnected youth through training and apprenticeship programs founded upon a mentoring relationship.

ReCity’s goal is to gather effective organizations together to empower youth to develop their gifts and connect them to meaningful careers. ReCity’s hope is to see these relationships ignite a movement that breaks down the barriers that separate us and catalyzes the reconciliation and restoration of the city.
Join ReCity in rewriting the story of our city together.

3 Ways to Get Involved

1) Mentor If you have a desire to build a mutually beneficial relationship with a disconnected youth in your community and can commit to invest just 1 hour a week for a year, click here to RSVP for our mentor training on Saturday, February 7thhttp://ow.ly/Hn8Zx

2) Share your skill set: Are you passionate and gifted in a particular field? Leverage your skills by teaching a class or seminar through ReCity that will help disconnected youth discover and develop their gifts so they can be equipped for the careers God is calling them to! http://ow.ly/Hj30k

3) Pray Prayer is essential to seeing the vision and mission of ReCity become reality. Join our prayer team and partner with us in praying that God would use ReCity to break down the walls that separate us and catalyze reconciliation and restoration in our city by the power of the gospel! Email Rob Shields (rob@recitynetwork.org) to receive regular updates on how you can be praying for ReCity!

ReCity from The Summit Church on Vimeo.

Tweets of the Week 1.20.15

There is great value in saying something in a memorable, concise manner. Twitter has caused us to make this a near spiritual discipline. For my own growth (as a generally verbose individual… that’s a long way of saying “wordy”) and for the benefit of others, I highlight tweets each week that deliver a big message in a few words.

Video: Overcoming Depression-Anxiety, A Responsibility Paradigm (Step 2)

Below is a videos from the presentation of “Overcoming Depression-Anxiety: A Personal Responsibility Paradigm.” For the various counseling options available from this material visit www.summitrdu.com/counseling.

The complementing studies  Overcoming Depression-Anxiety: A Suffering Paradigm and Towards a Christian Perspective of Mental Illness will also available in a video format after their presentation

NOTE: Many people have asked how they can get a copy of the seminar notebook referenced in this verbal presentation. Summit members can pick up a copy of the notebook in the church office. For those outside the Summit family, you can request a copy from Amy LaBarr (alabarr@summitrdu.com), office administrator over counseling.

“It Gets Worse Before It Gets Better”
ACKNOWLEDGE the breadth and impact of my sin.

Depression-Anxiety Responsibility Paradigm Step 2 from The Sam James Institute on Vimeo.

Memorize: II Corinthians 1:8-9 (ESV), “For we do not want you to be unaware, brothers, of the affliction we experienced in Asia. For we were so utterly burdened beyond our strength that we despaired of life itself. Indeed, we felt that we had received the sentence of death. But that was to make us rely not on ourselves but on God who raises the dead.” As you memorize this passage reflect upon these key points:

  • “To be unaware” – The Bible believes there is value in our awareness of how hard life can be even for believers.
  • “Affliction” – While not described in detail, these experiences surely manifested depression-anxiety symptoms.
  • “Beyond Our Strength” – Paul was not ashamed to admit, or to write, that these experiences were overwhelming.
  • “Despaired of Life” – Paul was willing to acknowledge the full extent to which his despairing thoughts reached.
  • “But… God” – We get to hear what God taught Paul through his depressive-anxious crisis. What God teaches or does in the midst of our depression-anxiety experience may be different, but God is no less faithful.

Teaching Notes

“Anxiety recruits additional anxiety. Persons with pathological anxiety (e.g., those with an anxiety disorder) typically scan the environment and are hyper vigilant for stimuli that might evoke anxiety and monitor themselves for symptoms of anxiety (such as rapid pulse or difficulty breathing). Such scanning and monitoring represents a state of anticipatory anxiety (p. 37).” Robert Albers, William Meller, and Steven Thurber in Ministry with Persons with Mental Illness and Their Families

“Strong emotions cause significant blind spots (p. 88)… We need to see chronic busyness as a warning bell that we’ve gotten out of tune with God and reduced ourselves into human doings instead of human beings (p. 180).” Leslie Vernick in Lord, I Just Want to Be Happy

“Mania can be fun at first, but if it goes too high or too fast, the fun ends and the nightmare begins (p. 51).” Kathryn Greene-McCreight in Darkness Is My Only Companion

“Anxiety about finances can give rise to coveting and greed and hoarding and stealing. Anxiety about succeeding at some task can make you irritable and abrupt and surly. Anxiety about relationships can make you withdrawn and indifferent and uncaring about other people. Anxiety about how someone will respond to you can make you cover the truth and lie about many things. So if anxiety could be conquered, a mortal blow would be struck to many other sins (p. 53).” John Piper in Future Grace

“When people struggle with a depressed mood, they do hurt emotionally, and the pain they feel spreads to every corner of their lives, touching all who know and love them (p. 22)… If you want to take the measure of someone’s character, the most direct route I can think of is to tell him no (p. 137).” Charles Hodges, M.D. in Good Mood Bad Mood

“Why does this happen? Because of the plasticity or mutability of the brain. Over time, new neural pathways can be created by habit of thought so that even the slightest suggestion of a frightening imagination can instantaneously produce a rapid heartbeat or upset stomach (p. 125).” Elyse Fitzpatrick and Laura Hendrickson in Will Medicine Stop the Pain?

Resource on Marriage & Personality from Gospel-Centered Marriage Series

The longer we are married, the easier it can be to view the ways our spouse is different from us as “bad” (moral language) or as a sign of incompatibility (threatening language). This tool is meant to help you see and celebrate the non-moral differences between you and your spouse.

The attributes listed are neither morally good nor morally bad. Neither side nor the center is necessarily “holy.” If you view these characteristics as moral qualities it will be harmful to your marriage. Your responsibility is to celebrate how God made your spouse and put the gospel on display finding ways to express loving unity in the midst of non-moral diversity.

“It is not your husband or wife’s choices that you are rejecting, but God’s… It is God who formed your spouse with his or her natural gifts and personality, and after he did, he stood back and declared your spouse ‘good.’ It is hurtful to your spouse when you disrespect her for things she did not choose or reject her for things she cannot change. Every difference is an opportunity to celebrate God’s creative artistry (p. 211).” Paul Tripp in What Did You Expect?

Instructions: Download and print the resource below. Write your initials where you believe you are on each spectrum. Write your spouse’s initials where you believe he/she is on each spectrum. Compare your assessment with your spouse’s assessment. Talk about:

(a) ways the two of you have viewed your differences as “bad” and this has caused conflict,
(b) ways that your differences compliment one another well, and
(c) how you have changed over the last few years.

To download the “Celebrating Our Non-Moral Differences” tool click here.

This resource is one part of the this upcoming seminar:

CREATING A GOSPEL-CENTERED MARRIAGE: FOUNDATIONS
Date: Saturday January 31, 2015
Time: 4:00 to 7:30 pm
Location: The Summit Church, Brier Creek South Venue
Address: 2415-107 Presidential Drive; Durham, NC 27703
Cost: Free
RSVP Here

CGCM_foundations_sm

Dr. Benjamin T. Mast on Romans 8 and Caring for a Loved One with Alzheimer’s Disease

mastThis blog is an excerpt from Dr. Benjamin T. Mast new book Second Forgetting: Remembering the Power of the Gospel during Alzheimer’s Disease. This is an important but neglected topic.

Benjamin Mast is an Associate Professor in the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences and an Associate Clinical Professor in Geriatric Medicine at the University of Louisville. He is a licensed clinical psychologist specializing in aging, Alzheimer’s disease, and dementia related issues. He is Co-Editor in Chief of the forthcoming American Psychological Association Handbook of Clinical Geropsychology (February 2015).

“Through the personal stories of those affected and the loved ones who care for them, Dr. Benjamin Mast highlights the power of the gospel for those suffering from Alzheimer’s disease. Filled with helpful, up-to-date information, Dr. Mast answers common questions about the disease and its effect on personal identity and faith as he explores the biblical importance of remembering and God’s commitment to not forget his people. In addition, he gives practical suggestions for how the church can come alongside families and those struggling, offering help and hope to victims of this debilitating disease.” From Amazon.com book description

—–

second forgettingWe know that the whole creation has been groaning as in the pains of childbirth right up to the present time. Not only so, but we our- selves, who have the first fruits of the Spirit, groan inwardly as we wait eagerly for our adoption to sonship, the redemption of our bodies. For in this hope we were saved. But hope that is seen is no hope at all. Who hopes for what they already have? But if we hope for what we do not yet have, we wait for it patiently. (Romans 8:22 – 25)

People with dementia know this groaning. Seeking life through the fog and confusion of dementia, they groan in frustration, both inwardly (as the passage indicates) and outwardly. Deep within they may recall a time when they were free from the weight of memory impairment and confusion, and they may long for a better day. Caregivers will also groan as they long for behavioral challenges to stop, as they long for a return to the way things were, and as they long for the person to remember. Both the person with dementia and the caregiver eagerly await the redemption and restoration of their bodies. As Paul tells us, we wait for something we do not yet see and do not yet have, but this does not change the reality of our hope. Waiting and hoping requires faith, but thankfully we do not wait alone.

In the same way, the Spirit helps us in our weakness. We do not know what we ought to pray for, but the Spirit himself intercedes for us through wordless groans. And he who searches our hearts knows the mind of the Spirit, because the Spirit intercedes for God’s people in accordance with the will of God. (Romans 8:26 – 27)

The grace of God is evident in the way he responds to us in our weakness. Here Paul explains that we sometimes suffer so greatly that we don’t even know what we ought to pray for. In these times, the Holy Spirit prays for us “through wordless groans.” The Spirit intercedes for us when we cannot think of the words to pray. If you are caring for a person with dementia and find yourself overwhelmed, seemingly unable to do anything, this passage is for you.

It is also a word of hope to the person who has dementia. In their weakness, the Spirit intercedes with wordless groans on their behalf as well. Sometimes, a person advances to a stage when articulating needs and prayers becomes difficult, if not impossible. But here we are told that the Lord continues to search and know their hearts, interceding on their behalf with these wordless groans in accordance with God’s will. Our faith is in a God who is good, loving, and compassionate. Even when we are unable to speak—perhaps because we are overwhelmed and weak or the disease has severely damaged our brain — we are promised that God still searches our hearts, seeing our innermost thoughts, fears, and hopes, and he responds with prayers on our behalf. God’s grace is so amazing. He gives us what we need when we are too weak or confused to ask for it ourselves. In Alzheimer’s disease we are reminded that God knows us better than we know ourselves.

Tweets of the Week 1.13.15

There is great value in saying something in a memorable, concise manner. Twitter has caused us to make this a near spiritual discipline. For my own growth (as a generally verbose individual… that’s a long way of saying “wordy”) and for the benefit of others, I highlight tweets each week that deliver a big message in a few words.

Video: Overcoming Depression-Anxiety, A Responsibility Paradigm (Step 1)

Below is a videos from the presentation of “Overcoming Depression-Anxiety: A Personal Responsibility Paradigm.” For the various counseling options available from this material visit www.summitrdu.com/counseling.

The complementing studies  Overcoming Depression-Anxiety: A Suffering Paradigm and Towards a Christian Perspective of Mental Illness will also available in a video format after their presentation

NOTE: Many people have asked how they can get a copy of the seminar notebook referenced in this verbal presentation. Summit members can pick up a copy of the notebook in the church office. For those outside the Summit family, you can request a copy from Amy LaBarr (alabarr@summitrdu.com), office administrator over counseling.

“The Battle Against What Might Happen
ADMIT I have a struggle I cannot overcome without God.

Depression-Anxiety Responsibility Paradigm Step 1 from The Sam James Institute on Vimeo.

Memorize: Psalm 56:3-4 (ESV), “When I am afraid, I put my trust in you. In God, whose word I praise, in God I trust; I shall not be afraid. What can flesh do to me?” As you memorize this passage reflect upon these key points:

  • “When I am afraid” – The authors of Scripture were never slow to acknowledge their anxiety or despair.
  • “Trust in you” – In moments of anxiety-depression we will trust something (our fear or God) and doubt the other.
  • “Whose word I praise” – The experience of anxiety-depression calls for more truth and right-thinking than peace.
  • “I shall not be afraid” – During times of anxiety-depression we must be direct with our own thoughts.
  • “What can” – Consider the influence of “what can” thinking versus “what if” thinking on depression-anxiety. 

Teaching Notes

“Fear and anxiety are more confident than they should be (p. 63)… You will trust in something or someone; that’s part of being human (p. 16).” Ed Welch in When I Am Afraid

“The problem is compounded with men because men aren’t supposed to be afraid. With no permission to discuss fears, men opt for anger (p. 34).” Ed Welch in Running Scared

“At some point Eve went from suffering to using that suffering to justify living in a way that disobeyed, even rebelled, against God (p. 129).” Charles Hodges, M.D. in Good Mood Bad Mood

“Such strange creatures are we that we probably smart more under blows which never fall upon us than we do under those which do actually come. The rod of God does not smite us as sharply as the rod of our own imagination does; our groundless fears are our chief tormentors.” Charles Spurgeon in his sermon “Our Needless Fears” delivered June 11, 1874.

“The fact that human beings are self-transcendent and thus can contemplate their own nonbeing/death, creates an anxiety that is central to our lives… Human beings live in the dilemma of both creatureliess and self-transcendence, which generates immense anxiety—the simultaneous anxiety of living and of dying (p. 47).” Robert Albers, William Meller, and Steven Thurber in Ministry with Persons with Mental Illness and Their Families

“Anxiety exists on a spectrum from normal to pathological and one of our tasks is to distinguish between the two (p. 34).” Robert Albers, William Meller, and Steven Thurber in Ministry with Persons with Mental Illness and Their Families

“Worriers are visionaries minus the optimism (p. 50)… No one can prove worriers wrong, so there is a veneer of reasonableness to every worry… Worry has become your talisman to ward off future catastrophe (p. 51).” Ed Welch in Running Scared

 

jordan 2013 retro NFL Seattle Seahawks Jersey NFL Houston Texans Jersey Air Jordan retro 5 Air Jordan 11 Bred Air Jordan retro 11 Air Jordan 5 Retro Air Jordan 11 Retro Air Jordan Retro Air Jordan 2013 Retro